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Geometric optimisation about Building the future with FRP composites
2012-04-25 22:05:49

 

We have already seen the ability to mould complex shapes to satisfy architectural desires,but this ability can have even greater impact when applied to produce highly efficient and structurally optimised building structures. As an example let's look at some FRP roofs covering 25 m diameter water treatment tanks.  
Both are produced from glass fibre reinforced polyester using hand lay-up moulding. The first roof (Figure 3) is a conventional structural arrangement consisting of primary glass reinforced plastic (GRP) beams supporting corrugated panels and weighs 14 tonnes. This also has similarities to how many building roofs are produced, consisting of numerous components with separate primary and secondary structures.
The second roof (pultruded fiberglass ) is an optimised monocoque structure consisting of a three-dimensional thin shell and only weighs 8 tonnes. Through the use of geometric optimisation it has been possible to reduce the material content by 43%. This design will require greater investment in engineering analysis and tooling, but will provide significant savings in production and assembly time on site.
It is therefore important to understand that most efficient FRP structures are fundamentally different in both geometric and structural form to conventional building structures. We therefore need to change the methodology of building design to enable FRP to provide more efficient solutions than are currently available with conventional building materials.
possible to reduce the material content by
43%. This design will require greater investment
in engineering analysis and tooling, but
will provide significant savings in production
and assembly time on site.
It is therefore important to understand
that most efficient FRP structures are fundamentally
different in both geometric and
structural form to conventional building
structures. We therefore need to change the
methodology of building design to enable
FRP to provide more efficient solutions than
are currently available with conventional
building materials.

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